2015 Design for Change: The Resilient City

 

DesignForChange_ResilientCity_Logo_1B

12th Annual Urban Design Conference

Raleigh Marriott City Center
Friday, March 6, 2015, 8:00 am to 5:00 pm

Early bird rates extended until 5pm, Monday, March 2. Register now! 

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NC State University College of Design in conjunction with the Department of City Planning, Urban Design Center and NC State Foundation

Design for Change: The Resilient City

Cities in the Mid-South region face dramatic change in demographics, population growth and increasing frequency of severe climate impacts. Planning and designing for resilience can help cities survive, adapt and grow as these changes affect demands on the built environment, infrastructure, transportation systems, and water and energy resources. Through a design lens, keynote speakers at NC State Design’s 2015 Urban Design Conference will frame relevant topics while case studies and design best practices will examine projects and strategies related to resilience. Major topics will include: built environment; water/natural resources; energy and technology; transportation; and green infrastructure.
Approved for 7 hours AIA CES/HSW. Submitted to NCBOLA and APA for 7 hrs; to LEED GBCI for 5 hrs.

Keynote Speakers:

Fiona Cousins, Arup
Nette Compton, The Trust for Public Land
Jason Hellendrung, Sasaki
Roy Torbert, Rocky Mountain Institute
Gena Wirth, SCAPE
Daniel Howe, FASLA, AICP, MODERATOR

Hotel

Raleigh Marriott City Center for 189.00 USD per night. (Make your reservation by February 12 to ensure rate. Some rooms available through College of Design; email jmlivaud@ncsu.edu)

Book your group rate: Urban Design Conference >>

Sponsors to date include:

Patrons:

AIA Triangle
Clancy & Theys Construction Company
McAdams Company

Contributors:

A.B. Goodrich Contracting, LLC
Adams an Oldcastle Company
Arup
Balfour Beatty Construction
Clearscapes
Cline Design Associates
ColeJenest & Stone
Concord Hospitality
Danis Construction Company
Davidson and Jones
DHM Design
Duda|Paine Architects
Duke University
Empire Properties
Gurlitz Architectural
Highwoods Properties, Inc.
JACOBS
JDavis Architects
Kane Realty Corporation
Kimley-Horn
McDonald York Building Company
Morningstar Law Group
Parsons Brinckerhoff
Perkins+Will
RATIO
Sasaki Associates
STEWART
Surface 678, PA
ULI Triangle
US Green Building Council NC
Withers & Ravenel


Images courtesy of Civitas.


Conference committee members of Design for Change:  The Resilient City, are seeking presenters to come forward with case study presentations. Do you have a case study related to urban resilience that our conference participants would find valuable? Let us know! Information and an online form below.

TIME: 
Each case study presentation is expected to be approximately 20 minutes long with an additional 5 minutes for questions.

CONTENT:
The case study presented (preferably one project, but no more than two) should describe a project example that advances methods for urban resilience design as a solution to one or more of the following issues/concerns:

  • urban form
  • urban landscape
  • water
  • energy
  • transportation
  • infrastructure

CRITERIA:
The selection committee will evaluate your proposal based on the following criteria:

  • How the case study advances the understanding of designing for resilience.
  • Overall quality and potential to contribute to a well-balanced conference program
  • Ability of the proposed case study to provide relevance to the Mid-South region (The case study does not have to be in the our region, but it must have transferable qualities to the region.)
  • Speaker’s experience
  • Ability of the presentation to contribute to the continuing education needs of architects, landscape architects and planners.

DUE DATE:
Friday, January 16, 2015 (end of day). You will be notified of your status by Friday, January 23.

BENEFIT:
Presenters will be granted a complimentary registration to the conference. (Past conferences have conferred 7 hours of AIA/HSW, NCBOLA and AICP credits, as well as GBCI for LEED AP.)

NOTE:
Case study presentations will be paired by topic for each session by the selection committee. Presenters will be asked to have their presentation available on a thumb drive as well as bring a personal laptop with their presentation on a hard drive for back-up.


Free Public Lecture

Lecture presented by City of Raleigh Appearance Commission
Design as a Vehicle for Social Equity
Presented by Anne Torney, AIA, Mithun

6:00pm to 7:00pm
AIA NC Center for Architecture and Design, 14 E. Peace Street in Raleigh

Conference

Friday, March 6, 2015
Raleigh Marriott City Center

Time Event
7:15 am
Registration and check-in opens/Continental Breakfast Buffet
8:00 am
Welcome by Marvin J. Malecha, FAIA and Daniel Howe, FASLA, AICP, Moderator
8:15 am
Building the Resilient City
Presented by Jason Hellendrung, ASLA, Sasaki Associates
9:15 am
The New Urban Renewal: Revitalizing Cities and Improving Infrastructure for the 21st Century
Presented by Nette Compton, ASLA, Trust for Public Land
10:15 pm
Case Study Break-Out Sessions A
11:15 pm
Coffee Break
11:30 pm
Case Study Break-Out Sessions B
12:30 pm
Buffet Lunch
Reinventing Fire
Presented by Roy Torbert, Rocky Mountain Institute
2:00 pm
Defining and Evaluating Resilient Cities
Presented by Fiona Cousins, PE LEED Fellow, Arup
3:00 pm
Brownie Break
3:15 pm
Adaptive Landscapes: Risk, Ecology, and Education
Presented by Gena Wirth, ASLA, Associate, SCAPE / Landscape Architecture PLLC
4:15 pm
Closing Remarks by Marvin J. Malecha, FAIA, and Daniel Howe, FASLA, AICP, Moderator
4:45 pm
Adjourn


Sponsors to date include:

Patrons:

AIA Triangle
Clancy & Theys Construction Company
McAdams Company

Contributors:

A.B. Goodrich Contracting, LLC
Adams an Oldcastle Company
Arup
Balfour Beatty Construction
Clearscapes
Cline Design Associates
ColeJenest & Stone
Concord Hospitality
Danis Construction Company
Davidson and Jones
DHM Design
Duda|Paine Architects
Duke University
Empire Properties
Gurlitz Architectural
Highwoods Properties, Inc.
JACOBS
JDavis Architects
Kane Realty Corporation
Kimley-Horn
McDonald York Building Company
Morningstar Law Group
Parsons Brinckerhoff
Perkins+Will
RATIO
Sasaki Associates
STEWART
Surface 678, PA
ULI Triangle
US Green Building Council NC
Withers & Ravenel


Conference Committee:

Chuck Flink, FASLA, CONFERENCE CO-CHAIR
President, Greenways Incorporated

Daniel Howe, FASLA, AICP, CONFERENCE CO-CHAIR
Adjunct Professor, Department of Landscape Architecture
NC State University College of Design

Robin Abrams, Ph.D., FAIA, ASLA
Head, School of Architecture
NC State University College of Design

Elizabeth Alley, AICP
Urban Designer + Planner, City of Raleigh Urban Design Center

Gene Bressler, FASLA
Head, Department of Landscape Architecture
NC State University College of Design

Lisa Esterrich, LEED GA
Landscape Architect, RATIO Architects

Andy Fox, ASLA, PLA
Assistant Professor, Department of Landscape Architecture
NC State University College of Design

George Hallowell, Ph.D., AIA
Adjunct Professor
NC State University College of Design

David Hill, AIA
Associate Professor, School of Architecture
NC State University College of Design

Robby Layton, FASLA
PhD Student, NC State University College of Design
Principal,
Design Concepts

Grant Meacci, ASLA, LEED AP
Division Manager, City of Raleigh Urban Design Center

Roula Qubain, AIA, LEED AP
Senior Associate, Moseley Architects

Graham Smith, ASLA
Principal, DHM Design

George Stanziale, ASLA
Senior VP, Director of Design Studio, STEWART

Michael Stevenson, FAIA
Design Principal | Global Buildings Design, JACOBS

Rodney Swink, FASLA, PLA
Senior Associate for Planning and Development, PlaceEconomics
Adjunct Professor, Department of Landscape Architecture
NC State University College of Design

Ex officio

Dean Marvin J. Malecha, FAIA
NC State University College of Design

Ken Bowers, AICP
City Planning Director, City of Raleigh

Conference Director

Jean Marie Livaudais
Assistant Dean for External Relations
NC State University College of Design


Keynote Presentations

Building the Resilient City
Presented by Jason Hellendrung, ASLA, Sasaki Associates
Hurricanes. Floods. Drought. Tornados. Polar vortexes. Sea Level Rise. Significant media attention in recent years has focused on cities and their infrastructure challenges associated with the increasing threats of climate change, more frequent and violent storms, and sea level rise. While cities face many challenges related to transportation and utility infrastructure, cities are equally vulnerable to economic and social shocks and stresses affecting communities. How do we make communities more resilient in the future? How do we define resilient communities? And, how do we make communities’ infrastructure systems more resilient, but also create more economically and socially resilient communities, healthier communities, as well as foster greater leadership and capacity building in cities? Jason Hellendrung will share some of Sasaki’s recent work combining research and practice of addressing these challenges and creating innovative solutions for the future.

The New Urban Renewal: Revitalizing Cities and Improving Infrastructure for the 21st Century
Presented by Nette Compton, ASLA, Trust for Public Land
Many American cities are at the forefront of planning for climate change, from the everyday to the possibly catastrophic. The best of these efforts embrace multi-layered approaches in policy and design in public space, improving performance today while addressing projected changes. Given the limitations in funding and space within urban areas, solutions must maximize co-benefits as well. Parks and open space can play a significant role in these transformations, repurposing aging infrastructure, reconsidering land use and reclaiming underused space, all towards the goal of making cities more attractive and livable. This process can be even more complicated than the final result itself, but thoughtful planning and meaningful community engagement can strengthen the results of and support for projects. Case studies will illuminate both the process and end results of this work in a number of US cities.

Reinventing Fire
Presented by Roy Torbert, Rocky Mountain Institute
While fossil fuels have enabled our modern lifestyle, their costs are increasingly outweighing their benefit. A massive transformation of our global energy system is required, and appearing in many sectors today. Reinventing Fire presents a roadmap for the United States to profitably transition away from fossil fuels, toward energy efficiency and renewable energy. To reach this future, and avoid the threat of climate change requires pursuing three opportunities. First, smart growth including mass transit can reduce vehicle use. Radical automotive efficiency can then make vehicle electrification affordable and save fuel for drivers, while using vehicles more productively. Second, new designs can make buildings and factories several times more efficient than they are now. Third, modernizing the electric system to make it diverse, distributed, and renewable can also make it clean, reliable and secure. Moreover, this transition could cost $5 trillion less in net present value (2009 $) than business-as-usual, counting all hidden or external costs at zero—a conservatively low estimate.

Defining and Evaluating Resilient Cities
Presented by Fiona Cousins, PE LEED Fellow, Arup
Resilience is a broad concept. How are cities challenged by resilience? How do you define resilience? And once you do, how do you evaluate your own city’s resilience? Presenter Fiona Cousins will describe the demographic changes that are leading to urbanization and the types of challenges that these shifts present for resilience. She will then talk about ways in which communities can identify potential risks and hazards so that they can define what resilience looks like for them. Examples of community planning to show how this works in practice will be offered. Registrants will learn about the City Resilience Index developed by Arup in collaboration with the Rockefeller Foundation. The index is a model for evaluating the resilience of individual cities so that planners can create a baseline and then check their progress against that base line. Fiona will describe each of the index’s quadrants with illustrating case examples.

Adaptive Landscapes: Risk, Ecology, and Education
Presented by Gena Wirth, ASLA, Associate, SCAPE / Landscape Architecture PLLC
Landscape architects engage engineering and infrastructure projects in complex ways, from concept through construction. The talk will focus on recent SCAPE collaborations where designers have led the development of synthetic urban resiliency strategies – with a focus on the HUD Rebuild by Design proposal Living Breakwaters,  a strategy for climate change resilience in New York City. An emphasis will be placed on the importance of interdisciplinary exchange and creative community engagement in the design of sustainable urban infrastructure.

Case Study Break-Out Presentations

There are 4 tracks for case studies. Each track will have two sessions. During each session, two 20-minute case study presentations will be offered (different cases for each session). Please feel free to switch tracks after the first session, but please remain in a session once you have selected it.

SESSION A 10:15 AM – 11:15 AM

Community, UNIVERSITY A

Food Corridors in Raleigh and Durham
presented by Erin White,Founder, Community Food Lab
The Raleigh Food Corridor is an emerging, innovative project that connects diverse neighborhoods along two miles of Blount and Person streets in Raleigh, using the benefits of local food to create a common dialogue and vision for the future. By engaging with the communities along the Raleigh Food Corridor, grassroots energy has been captured that is now being steered towards a wide range of local food projects. While a top-down vision is necessary to align resources and missions, the grassroots and bottom-up energy of the project is essential if the project is to achieve lasting impact around health, community economies, and sustainability. It is a holistic community-building project that uses local food as the toolkit to achieve urban shifts towards community and self-efficacy. The project was initiated by Community Food Lab in 2013, and has since attracted numerous partners and stakeholders. The ideas behind the Raleigh Food Corridor have been explored in partnership with Reinvestment Partners in Durham since 2012, along a block of Geer St where a new food hub, urban gardens, and a healthy corner store are part of community revitalization efforts. Community Food Lab brought the food corridor concept to Reinvestment Partners in 2012, and have since helped visualize, initiate, and manage the individual food system projects and collaborations that make up this pioneering food corridor in Durham. The case presentation on these two food corridor projects will focus on Raleigh, primarily. It will present the elements of a food corridor that make it a replicable model, and will explain what parts have been valuable as place-based processes not unlike what we call place-making. Lessons learned will be discussed, as well as outlook for the future of this dynamic, ambitious project. The case presentation will also discuss the importance of small scale urban food projects as place-making tools, and ways to create effective public space using urban agriculture and food system initiatives. By using a highly visual presentation, the concepts of food corridors will be connected directly to pressing urban needs, and presented as flexible place-based concepts adaptable to various settings, stakeholders, and communities.

Erin White is Principal and Founder of Community Food Lab. Trained as an architect, he now works to develop innovative design approaches to building healthy food systems. He has degrees from North Carolina State University and Bowdoin College. A native of North Carolina, he gardens extensively with his wife and baby boy in Raleigh NC.

Bringing Value through Health District Planning
presented by Daniel Windsor, AICP, PP, LEED® AP BD+C
A healthy neighborhood is good for any medical center’s bottom line. For years, health in the U.S. has been focused on caring for the individual patient. As a new healthcare delivery emerges, the focus must shift from caring for those within the walls of the hospital and taking an active role in the health and well?being of the whole community. The Gundersen Health System recognizes that their own sustainability is connected to the success and vitality of the surrounding community. To that end, the system partnered with the city of La Crosse to develop a Joint Neighborhood Campus Plan. The focus of the plan is the symbiotic relationship between the neighborhood and the health system. Gundersen’s primary medical center resides in a historic health district that has been challenged with crime, a transient population and lack of connectivity. The Joint Plan sets up a framework for making connections and redeveloping this transitioning neighborhood in balance with the needs and goals of the medical center. It also sets up a framework and strategy for a safer, revitalized neighborhood that encourages a more livable, walkable and therefore healthy place to live, work and recreate.

Daniel Windsor is an urban designer and certified planner for Perkins+Will’s New York Office. An Associate and LEED Accredited Professional, Daniel is committed to expanding sustainable ideas into the public realm and across larger scales with a particular commitment to how our built environments affect our health. His portfolio contains countless projects across the world varying in scale and urban context. His interests in City Design, Large Scale Mixed-Use, Health District Planning and Campus Master Planning outline his passion for complex evolving urban systems. By identifying a framework based on good city design and sound sustainable planning principles, Daniel strives to create enduring places of beauty that transform our everyday lives. As a planner Daniel has worked with both public and private clients to build networks and enhance the public interface that make our cities great.

Renewal, UNIVERSITY B

SHEDDING (b)LIGHT: A Case Study on Distributed Community Infrastructure as a Catalyst for Urban Renewal
presented by Sara Queen, Assistant Professor of Architecture, David Hill, AIA, Associate Professor of Architecture and Andrew Fox, ASLA, PLA, Assistant Professor of Architecture, NC State University
Already a national bellwether in re-imaging urban infrastructure, from bicycle transportation and renewable energy production to historic preservation and education reform, New Orleans can harness the multi-dimensional potential hidden in its vacant lands to address the social, cultural and environmental needs of both its present and its many futures. To achieve this, the SHEDDING [b]LIGHT proposal employs a scalable and incremental framework to address all of vacancy’s dimensions in New Orleans by first identifying where the challenges and opportunities of re-purposing vacant land are most efficiently aligned, and second by deploying a system of scalable community hubs in those targeted locations throughout the city.  Programmatically, each hub will be equipped to deliver a range of socially, culturally, and ecologically essential services. From health clinics to solar arrays, laundromats to job training sites, the programming at these hubs will both fill existing gaps in community function, and grow civic capacity to respond to anticipated demographic and ecological changes throughout New Orleans. Shedding [b]Light embraces the potential for strategic projects at the site scale to realize impacts that echo throughout the region. The community hubs will immediately provide critical remedies for communities stricken with vacancy and blight, but just as critical will be the rippling impacts that they have on the city and region in the coming decades. We anticipate the site-specific elements of our strategy will scale up and fill out, galvanizing more profound shifts in regional patterns of development, infrastructure, and interfacing between the built and ecological environments.

Andrew Fox, PLA, ASLA is a registered landscape architect and Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture, co-director of the Coastal Dynamics Design Lab, University Faculty Scholar, and Community Engaged Faculty Fellow at NC State University. His research and professional expertise is in the areas of green infrastructure, urban design, community engagement, and construction technology.

David Hill, AIA a registered architect and Associate Professor of Architecture, co-director of the Coastal Dynamics Design Lab, and University Faculty Scholar at NC State University. His teaching and research focus on integrative digital simulation processes, architectural prototypes, and design strategies for coastal regions.

Sara Queen, Assoc. AIA is an Assistant Professor of Architecture and TH!NK Faculty Fellow at NC State University. Her teaching and research investigates infrastructural networks through mapping methodologies with the goal of facilitating deeper, more diverse understandings of urban systems and the processes which shape physical place, cultural space and social
territory.

ThirdLine: Networking Environmental, Social, and Cultural Spaces in Tulane/Gravier (ULI Hines Competition Student Entry)
presented by Mikey Goralnik and Eric Thomas, landscape arhcitecture and UNC-CH planning; Xinbo Du, landscape architecture; Will Sendor and Michael Wengenroth, architecture
This response to the ULI Gerald Hines Student Competition specifies specific solutions within a comprehensive project to a challenged area of New Orleans. The interdisciplinary response utilizes the practices architecture, landscape architecture, planning, urban design, business development and social justice to address the challenged area and provide solutions.

Infrastructure, CONGRESSIONAL

Green Over Gray: Cleveland’s New Infrastructure
presented by Benjamin Monette, ASLA, Senior Landscape Architect, Surface 678
Urban growth structures and patterns in the Global South are influenced by any number of interconnected macro and micro pressures, functions, and changes. While a vast swath of the southeast, and to some extent the southwest, continue to undergo rapid growth, a subset of cities in the northeast (primarily the rustbelt cities) have experienced, and continue to experience, a significant decline in population. In many rust-belt cities, vacant and abandoned structures, polluted post industrial sites, decaying above ground infrastructure, shrinking tax bases, and a combined water and sewer system contribute to a cycle of urban atrophy. These cities are engaged in a life and death struggle where urban planners, legislators, business owners, and citizens fight for the survival their communities. To that end, there are creative, adaptive solutions that build on existing strengths and look to leverage government mandates for positive growth. Among these strategies is a move towards green infrastructure. In an adaptation of the EPA’s definition, green infrastructure can be described as a storm water management approach that uses vegetation, soils, and natural or engineered processes to manage water and create healthier urban environments. This presentation will focus on a highly conceptual design for the re-imagining of Cleveland’s infrastructure through the leveraging of their EPA mandate. This leveraging of opportunities in an effort to facilitate sustainable development within the urban form, design and planning strategies must involve the equal pursuance of social, economical and environmental viability with thoughtful attention to qualitative detail.

Ben Monette’s career has focused primarily on high profile public projects of various scales where he has had the opportunity to work with many world renowned planners, architects and designers. He has lead intense site scale urban design efforts as well as city scale green infrastructure planning. He has had the good fortune to participate in many artist collaborations, working with such artists as Robert Israel, Roxy Paine, and most recently Janet Echelman. This dynamic scale jumping and unique collaboration invigorates, and enhances his work.

In addition to working as a Senior Landscape Architect first at OLIN and now at Surface 678, Ben is a lecturer and critic at the University of Pennsylvania and Philadelphia University and a former professor of landscape architecture at Temple University. He has been inspired by the community outreach and extension while attending graduate school at NC State and he continues to seek out opportunities to integrate these lessons into his ongoing design work.

Void to Magnet: holistic brownfield reclamation
presented by Chris Mendel, Associate and Landscape Architect, Andropogon Associates
An 11-acre contaminated brownfield, was an industrial site and parking lot located within the Nicetown/Hunting Park neighborhoods of Philadelphia. The abandoned site, previously covered with impermeable surfaces, was a “hollowed-out, industrial-era exclusion zone” that detracted from its low-income neighborhoods. The Salvation Army Joan and Ray Kroc Community Center now provides a universally accessible, transit-oriented, dynamic, multi-functional campus that accommodates gatherings, urban agriculture, and passive and active recreation. The former void in the center of Northwest Philly is now a magnet.
The site design presents one of the most comprehensive sustainable landscape approaches in Philadelphia, using a combination of water management techniques and site waste recycling strategies. 100% of the first three-plus inches of stormwater runoff from the site and building is captured, reused, and infiltrated on site using a combination of cisterns, rain gardens, porous pavements, and engineered soil mixes. Nearly all of the site’s existing pavements were recycled and reused on-site with the goal of making this a “zero-waste” construction effort. The Community Center is one of the region’s most environmentally progressive brownfield reclamations and redevelopments.

Chris Mendel is an Associate and Landscape Architect with Andropogon Associates; a Philadelphia-based ecological design and planning firm. He (as with all of Andropogon) uses an analysis-driven process to design for man and nature, to the benefit of both. His professional and volunteer work are focused on environmental protection and encouraging deep connections between people and place. He has conceived and implemented designs for urban brownfields, waterfronts, and fallow farms including the construction of seven major parks and open spaces; and contributed to six campus master plans in both urban and rural contexts.

Chris served in the US Peace Corps as a natural resources management volunteer in the Mekong River basin of Thailand and has a Masters in Landscape Architecture from the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry. He is currently designing and managing the repurposing of a 21 acre Fredrick Law Olmsted park in his hometown of Buffalo, New York and a network of therapeutic green roof gardens for the Washington University Medical Center in St. Louis, Missouri.

Systems, UNIVERSITY C

Empire State Building: The Retrofit
presented by Roy Torbert, Manager, Rocky Mountain Institute
One year after the Empire State Building retrofit, the building exceeds its energy-efficiency guarantee by five percent, saving $2.4 million or a three year payback, and establishing a commercial real estate model for reducing costs, maximizing return on investment, increasing real estate value, and protecting the environment. The factors ultimately setting the Empire State Building retrofit apart were integrated design and a ‘right-steps in the right-order’ model that can be applied to any building of any size.

Keynote speaker Roy Torbert is a Manager within Rocky Mountain Institute’s Buildings Practice, where he specializes in university net zero efforts, project cost analyses, and renewable and efficiency finance. He has worked with leading universities and global multinationals to analyze net-zero opportunities, and deliver roadmaps to reaching carbon reduction goals. He leads RMI’s work with the General Services Administration (GSA), including GSA’s partnerships with energy service companies to retrofit the federal building stock. He performs policy review, addresses market impediments to deep energy efficiency, and contributes to RMI’s outreach efforts. Roy assisted on research and analysis for RMI’s Reinventing Fire initiative and book, and currently manages the Reinventing Fire effort. Prior to RMI, Roy was a consultant with Booz Allen Hamilton in Washington D.C., working on software implementation and strategic management projects for the Army. He has expertise collaborating with regulators, policymakers, and private industry. He graduated from the College of William and Mary with a degree in International Relations and Business Finance. He has been trained in project management, software implementation, and data
analysis.

Electric Vehicles of All Shapes and Sizes – New Transportation Alternatives in the Urban Landscape
presented by Anne Tazwell, Clean Transportation Program Manager, NC Clean Energy Technology Center
New transportation alternatives in the electric vehicle space – whether they’re full sized, neighborhood, or light electric vehicles – can enable urban areas to accommodate growth without increasing transportation related emissions or exacerbating air quality problems. Electric vehicle specifications fit most urban driving habits and needs perfectly, where conventional gas- and diesel-powered vehicles create unhealthy air quality and congestion problems. Plug-in electric vehicles like the Nissan LEAF, the Chevy Volt, and the three Ford plug-ins are just like any other sedans – full sized, full speed, and highway capable. Neighborhood Electric Vehicles are much smaller, but are allowed on most roads with a speed limit up to 45 miles per hour. The Light Electric Vehicle category includes anything from a battery-assisted bicycle to smaller 4-wheeled battery-powered vehicles used on neighborhood roads and golf courses. Anne Tazwell will present information from two North Carolina cities – Charlotte and Raleigh – where the three categories of electric vehicles described above are finding (and making) a niche to reduce transportation related emissions and congestion in the urban environment.

Anne Tazewell has worked in the clean transportation arena for fifteen years and currently serves as the Transportation Program Manager at the North Carolina Clean Technology Center at NC State University. With state and federal funding, Anne leads efforts to diversify fuel use and reduce transportation related emissions by increasing the use of alternative fuels, advanced transportation technologies and fuel conservation practices. Current Clean Transportation team activities include the $6.2 million federal Congestion Mitigation Air Quality supported Clean Fuel Advanced Technology project. Anne has a degree in Environmental Studies from New College in Sarasota FL and is passionate about transportation technology and policy solutions that support energy diversity, economic and environmental enhancement. She is also a featured author in the Small Stories, Big Changes  book published by New Society Press.

SESSION B 11:30 AM t-12:30 PM

Community, UNIVERSITY A

Conserve and Revitalize- The Tar River Legacy Plan
presented by Ron Sessoms, Urban Designer, Rhodeside and Harwell
Before the popularity of modern air, rail, and automotive resources, rivers served as primary corridors for the exchange of goods and services. Particularly in Eastern North Carolina, rivers were critical transportation routes connecting communities and regions. One such river in Eastern Carolina is the Tar River, a 215-mile river corridor that extends from the northern Piedmont of North Carolina to the Pamlico Sound, eventually flowing into the Atlantic Ocean. Over time, as new transportation resources have become more popular and efficient, waterways like the Tar River have become less influential as major transport corridors, leaving many communities to “turn their backs” to this significant resource. In many cases, once thriving riverfront areas have become secondary to sprawling, suburban sections anchored by automotive corridors. Further exacerbating these changes are perceptions, by some, that the riverfront is a hazardous, flood-prone, liability that cannot provide much in the way of economic benefit to a community.

Greenville, NC is one of many communities located along the banks of the Tar River. From its humble beginnings as a small agrarian community, the City has grown into an economic hub for the Eastern North Carolina region, defined by historically-significant neighborhoods and vibrant educational, medical, and sports amenities. Historically, the Tar River was a significant contributor to the growth of the City providing drinking water, recreation, and trade routes for agricultural goods such as rice, cotton, lumber and tobacco. Even before these economic trade and recreational ventures, the Tar River was used by the Indigenous people of the area. Some historical records, which may be more legend than fact, claim that the Indians called it the Taw River, meaning the “river of health.”

Ron Sessoms, is an associate and urban designer at Alexandria, VA- based, Rhodeside and Harwell. Combining his academic background in Urban and Regional Planning from East Carolina University, completion of the Masters of Urban Design program at UNC-Charlotte, and his professional experience, Mr. Sessoms has gained expertise in the art of creating valuable and enduring human environments. Over his professional career, Mr. Sessoms has engaged in a number of corridor planning and design, community revitalization, and low impact development projects. His project experience includes the design of complex, fine-grain public spaces such as in the West Main Street Streetscape and Urban Design Framework Plan for the City of Charlottesville, VA- a 1-mile street reconstruction project that provides a vision for the future of that City’s most significant urban corridors. Mr. Sessoms has also worked on a number of regional scaled studies including the Route 1 Multi-Modal Alternatives Analysis project which envisions the revitalization of 14-miles of the Richmond Highway corridor in Northern Virginia, and the Tar River Legacy Plan in Greenville, NC which focuses on strategies to improve over 7-miles of the City’s diverse riverfront.

Natural Capital: an Ecosystem Services Approach to Floodplain Design
presented by Mikey Goralnik, joint master’s candidate, NC State Landscape Architecture and UNC-CH City and Regional Planning
While recent initiatives like the 100 Resilient Cities Challenge and Rebuild By Design competition have stimulated considerable conversation related to resiliency in urban contexts, there has been comparatively little discussion in planning and design circles on achieving resiliency outside of the city. For many small communities, this lack of attention, coupled with the limitations in capacity (including staff, funding, and other resources) that often plague rural municipalities, constitute significant roadblocks on the path to resiliency for millions of Americans. “Natural Capital: an Ecosystem Services Approach to Floodplain Design” explores potential roles for ecosystem service assessments in rural resiliency planning and design. Using the InVEST ecosystem service analysis tool, I gauge the economic value of two discrete ecosystem services (nutrient retention and carbon sequestration/storage) that operate within the 750 acres of Kinston, NC’s FEMA buyout zone. I then explore, compare, and evaluate design scenarios that both optimize each of these ecosystem services, and incorporate critical community programming such as recreation, food security, and interactive placemaking on the site. Finally, I speculate on how this ecosystem service-based strategy can be applied in other rural communities in eastern North Carolina and elsewhere.

Mikey Goralnik is a concurrent degree student in the Masters of City and Regional Planning program at UNC-Chapel Hill and Masters in Landscape Architecture program at NC State University. He has worked at the UNC Institute for the Environment, the UNC Coastal Hazards Center, and the LSU Coastal Sustainability Studio to explore and communicate the linkages between hazard mitigation, climate change adaptation, and Smart Growth planning practices that encourage economic development and promote social justice. A former policy fellow at North Carolina Sea Grant, Mikey received the 2014 North Carolina ASLA Award for Student Excellence and is the 2014 recipient of the Wendy L. Olson Award for Public Service in Landscape Architecture. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in American Studies from Tufts University.

Renewal, UNIVERSITY B

The Urban Renewal Plan that’s Capturing the Attention of an Oscar-Winner
presented by Burt Pinnock, Principal and Architect, Baskervill
“What’s this place about? #ShockoeBottom” Tweeted last October by Lupita Nyong’o of the famed “12 Years a Slave”, the question is simple and direct. It’s also loaded and wildly complicated.

Once home to the second largest slave trading operation in our country, today Shockoe Bottom is Richmond’s most controversial neighborhood. It’s currently the site of a proposed development plan that puts a new minor league stadium in the heart of former slave jails, auction houses, and burial grounds. Coupled with the ballpark are the proposed Slavery and Freedom Heritage Sites, a museum and archaeological site that will preserve these valuable spots, giving visitors to the area an opportunity to learn about Richmond’s storied slave history. Supporters of the plan say it’s a win-win, giving the underutilized neighborhood a push toward economic vibrancy and renewed historic meaning. Opponents claim the ballpark will demean the human suffering that took place at this site. In this presentation, Burt Pinnock, AIA, the lead architect of the proposed slavery sites project, seeks to explore the intricacies behind this highly polarizing debate that pits historic preservation against urban growth, while illustrating how one design vision can bridge the gap between past and present. The presentation will also bring to light a larger question: how designers can become advocates for an urban landscape that promotes socioeconomic and cultural change.

Burt Pinnock’s passion for design has created award-winning work for countless communities, from historic cities and cultural institutions to forward-thinking companies and inspiring foundations. Burt’s work is rooted in the belief that architecture can provide solutions to cultural challenges. His approachable attitude and friendly smile have opened many doors as both a speaker and design leader. Burt has been a guest lecturer at the National Organization of Minority Architects Convention International Symposium and at Architecture Exchange East, and he served as adjunct faculty in Virginia Commonwealth University’s Department of Interior Design. He’s also been tapped to serve on the Commonwealth of Virginia Art and Architectural Review Board and is the cofounder and chairperson of Storefront for Community Design. He is also a former peer reviewer for the National Endowment for the Arts and the General Services Administration. In 2013, he was honored with the AIA Award for Distinguished Achievement.

Tackling Urban Resilience in Johannesburg: A Case Study on the Interplay of Changing Demographics and Stormwater Risk
presented by Sebastian Fischbeck, Lead Design Architect, Provencher Roy Associés Architectes Inc
Two decades after the end of the Apartheid regime, South Africa has faced a major change in demographics, as a result of rural depopulation and migratory streams from neighbouring sub-Saharan countries. Said to be Africa’s powerhouse, the large agglomeration of Johannesburg has been challenged by the impacts of this migration, particularly in terms of infrastructure planning. As architectural researchers have underlined, the uncertainty that characterizes Johannesburg’s resilient conditions implies “knowing the transformation’s origins but a loss to name its destination” (Lindsay Bremner et al., 2003/13). In addition to changing demographics, Johannesburg has also faced increasing risk from stormwater. Due to climate change, this risk has aggravated in recent years, with increasing rainfalls causing more widespread urban flooding (O.B. Adegun, 2013). In this regard, it is urgent that settlements located on wetlands and flood lands in particular focus on planning and designing for resilience. The presentation addresses the issue of tackling urban resilience in Johannesburg.  Presenter will discuss the challenges of both demographics and stormwater in Diepsloot in order to show the implications of this densely populated settlement of almost a quarter of a million inhabitants, looking at the inhabitants’ informal strategies to cope with resilience, and juxtaposing them against the city planners’ formal approach. The interplay of changing demographics and stormwater risk creates a demand for both socially and environmentally sustainable strategies.

Sebastian Fischbeck is a German design architect. Currently, he works as Lead Design Architect at Provencher Roy Associates in Montreal, Canada. Throughout his professional career, he has overseen large projects and master plans in a variety of countries, including Italy, Austria, Germany, South Africa, Canada, and at Asymptote Architecture in New York. While working as Head of the Design Division at Berger + Parkkinen in Austria, his team won numerous prizes in prestigious international commissions.

He holds both a Master’s and a Bachelor’s degree in Architecture from the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna, Austria. Moreover, he was a visiting scholar at AHO in Norway, under the supervision of Professor Charles Waldheim. Sebastian received the Carl-Appel Award for his Master’s Thesis on the Choreographic Center in Berlin. Moreover, the Austrian Ministry of Education, Arts and Culture awarded him the prestigious Tische-Stipend to pursue a six-months research collaboration in Johannesburg, South Africa. His design research has been presented at international architecture exhibitions in Los Angeles, Berlin, and Vienna.

Infrastructure, CONGRESSIONAL

Emerging Practice: Integrating Pre-Disaster Mitigation Planning into Community Planning
presented by Jackie Turner, Urban Planner, RATIO Architects
On June 10, 2008, one of the Midwest’s worst flood-related disasters occurred in southern Illinois. Heavy rainfall caused four levees to breach near the City of Lawrenceville, which severely damaged or completely destroyed nearly 200 homes. Erosion created by the levee breach left the City and several surrounding towns without clean water.

As a result of this catastrophic event, Lawrenceville received a Hurricane Ike CDBG grant to update a 20-year old comprehensive plan and prepare a new hazard mitigation plan. Unlike many of the 25,000 local governments that have also prepared hazard mitigation plans since the passing of the Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000, these plans were intentionally coordinated with other municipal planning efforts.

Lawrenceville, Illinois provides an interesting case study of how a community of 5000 people plagued with repeated flood issues was able to achieve both a new and integrated Comprehensive Plan and FEMA approved Pre-Disaster Mitigation Plan. These planning efforts will allow the community to become more resilient and able to prevent and/or bounce back faster from social, physical and environmental hazards, while better managing the risk from future floods in how the community is planned, designed and built.

Jackie Turner, an Urban Planner at RATIO, has more than 25 years of experience in urban design, community planning and landscape architecture in both the public and private sector.  Jackie is passionate about creating healthy context-sensitive environments in which we can live, work and play. She is committed to providing professional expertise in planning and design services that respond to a client’s needs while exhibiting a creative flair and environmental sensitivity, reflecting modern design theories. Throughout her career, Jackie has prepared zoning ordinances, comprehensive plans, master plans, environmental documents, planting and irrigation plans and developed design guidelines for numerous communities. A skilled speaker, she has used her exceptional communication skills to educate the community and present projects and facilitate meetings, workshops and charrettes.

Creating places for people and stormwater with the spaces between: a look at Shoemaker Green, a SITES pilot project
presented by Emily McCoy, Associate Landscape Architect, Andropogon Associates
Shouldn’t our landscapes do more than simply look good? Is it possible for interstitial, remnant exterior spaces in our cities to have meaningful contributions aesthetically, ecologically, and socially? What are the necessary constituents which can ensure success?
This presentation will delve into the realm of performance-based landscapes within an urban context by focusing on The University of Pennsylvania’s Shoemaker Green project. As a SITES pilot project, the design goals were to improve water, soil, vegetation, materials, human health and well-being in unison. The project is a design that is based on performance, a thorough understanding of natural systems, and how these systems function within the built environment. Each component from the existing site materials, soils, water, vegetation, insects, wildlife, and humans all play a role in a healthy functioning ecological system and it is from this system-based thinking that the design of the Shoemaker Green project evolved. Lastly, as a requirement of the SITES program, a monitoring plan was established with the university and this discussion will focus on how a monitoring program for a site can be established and discusses the preliminary findings.

Emily McCoy, PLA, ASLA is the Director of Integrative Research and an Associate Landscape Architect at Andropogon Associates, an adjunct professor, and serves on the Education Committee of the Landscape Architecture Foundation. In all roles, Mrs. McCoy strives to contribute to the knowledge base of landscape architecture by exploring the interplay between professional practice and research. Emily holds a Master of Landscape Architecture with a concentration in natural resource management and GIS from North Carolina State University; a Bachelor of Science in Ecology from Appalachian State University; and has past professional experience as a horticulturist and research assistant in both design and biology fields.

Systems, UNIVERSITY C

Both programs jointly presented by NC State Design’s Andy Fox, ASLA, PLA, Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture and David Hill, AIA, Associate Professor of Architecture
Coastal Dynamics: Engaging Outer Banks Residents and Agencies in the Research and Design Process
with students Beth Faragan, landscape architecture, Rebecca Ryan, Architecture
Recent natural disasters and trends in sea level rise highlight the need for holistic methods of analyzing and planning for more resilient coastal communities along the North Carolina Outer Banks. This presentation will illustrate how NC State University College of Design professors and students in the Coastal Dynamics Design Lab (CDDL) engage coastal residents and agencies in programs that analyze physical, social, demographic, climatic, and infrastructural characteristics of Dare County. Students conduct workshops at the UNC Coastal Studies Institute, where they gather and share information with community stakeholders, and produce a series of diagrammatic illustrations that reveal critical conditions along the Outer Banks. Primary topics include cultural history and demographics, infrastructure, climatology, ecology, food systems, industry and manufacturing, coastal storms, disaster preparedness and relief plans, mitigation practices, and land development patterns and policies.

Through this rigorous, interactive, collaborative model, designers, scientists, and community groups can more effectively identify and address disturbing trends that place ever-increasing coastal populations in the path of bigger, stronger, and more devastating climatic events. By engaging community and government stakeholders, and consulting with coastal scientists, students and Outer Banks residents develop a series of problem statements and proposals that enable future implementation of highly adaptable, resilient, and holistic design schemes.

Pro-Active Recovery Community Structures (PARCS) for the Outer Banks
with students Logan Free, landscape architecture, Andrew McCall, architecture
This session will describe an innovative series of projects that is expanding research and community design activity in the area of coastal resiliency and adaptation in this highly dynamic region. Operated from within the NC State College of Design, the Coastal Dynamics Design Lab (CDDL) is working with the University of North Carolina Coastal Studies Institute (CSI) and the Dare County Office of Emergency Management (OEM) to identify critical climate-related issues that confront coastal communities. Together, the team is asking: How can municipalities in regions at risk of large Atlantic storms and sea-level change proactively develop damaged and underutilized sites into resilient, multi-use public facilities that are capable of quickly transforming into centers of community recovery during post-disaster response?

A proactive approach to post-disaster site design and development has the ability to improve marginalized victims’ experiences and resultant recovery through the creation of restorative environments that recognize and respond to emotional strife, address negative psychosomatic effects, and propel displaced victims toward a return to their pre-disaster lifestyles. The CDDL has developed the term Pro-Active Recovery Community Structures (PARCS) to generally describe a design approach that creates public amenities for day-to-day use that are capable of quickly transforming into post-disaster staging and recovery sites. When fully developed, PARCs most commonly function as traditional parklands and/or community service centers. As multi-functional developments, they offer permanent, localized communities a place of daily recreation and respite. In times of post-disaster crisis, PARCs facilitate the rapid assembly and disassembly of temporary housing structures.

Andrew Fox, PLA, ASLA is a registered landscape architect and Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture, co-director of the Coastal Dynamics Design Lab, University Faculty Scholar, and Community Engaged Faculty Fellow at NC State University. His research and professional expertise is in the areas of green infrastructure, urban design, community engagement, and construction technology.

David Hill, AIA a registered architect and Associate Professor of Architecture, co-director of the Coastal Dynamics Design Lab, and University Faculty Scholar at NC State University. His teaching and research focus on integrative digital simulation processes, architectural prototypes, and design strategies for coastal regions.

Beth Faragan is in her second year of study in the NCSU MLA program. She joined the program after completing undergraduate studies in fine art at UNC Charlotte and working in a letterpress print shop.

Rebecca Ryan graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2012 with a bachelor’s degree in mathematics and studio art. She is currently in her second year at NC State University to earn a masters degree in architecture.

Logan Free is a 3rd year student in the Master of Landscape Architecture program at the NC State College of Design.

Andrew McCall is 3rd year student in the Track 3 Master of Architecture program at the NC State College of Design.


Conference Presenters and Moderator

J Compton Headshot_web Nette Compton is Associate Director of City Park Development at The Trust for Public Land, where she oversees national urban park programs and initiatives including creative placemaking, design quality, sustainability, green infrastructure and climate change. She previously served at the NYC Parks Department as the Director of Green Infrastructure and project manager for the High Performance Landscape Guidelines. A registered Landscape Architect, she is the President of the American Society of Landscape Architects New York Chapter.
FCousins_web Fiona Cousins, PE, CEng, LEED Fellow, is a mechanical engineer, sustainability consultant and principal in Arup’s New York office, where she leads the sustainability team. She is a member of the Arup Americas board with particular responsibility for directing technical and research investments for the region. Fiona is inspired by working with other members of the design team to develop buildings that are both great to be in and look at, that also perform well for comfort, and energy and resource use. She believes that this is best achieved through clear goal-setting supported by integrated design practice. She has spent much of her career translating sustainable design concepts and goals, especially those related to energy, into practical programs of action, and is always looking for new ways to talk about energy use reduction.
JHellendrung_web Jason Hellendrung, ASLA, is one of the leaders in the Urban Studio at Sasaki Associates directing landscape architecture, planning and urban design work on a wide range of complex, urban and public infrastructure projects. Much of Jason’s work involves re-shaping cities through public infrastructure improvements, and in particular, waterfront redevelopment and preparing cities to adapt to climate change, the integration of transit into the city, and parks planning in urban areas. His recent and current work includes leading Sasaki’s proposal for the HUD Rebuild by Design project for the Jersey Shore, assisting the Rockefeller Foundation on the National Disaster Resilience Competition and 100 Resilient Cities program, participation in developing 8 community reconstruction plans for NY Rising, and leading Sasaki’s work on the Sea Change: Boston exhibit and co-authoring Designing with Water: Creative Solutions from Around the Globe, with The Boston Harbor Association. Jason was the project manager of the urban design and landscape architecture for the Healthline BRT and transformation of Euclid Avenue in Cleveland. Jason was also the Managing Principal of the Cedar Rapids River Corridor Redevelopment Plan and implementation of several design projects developed by Sasaki with the community to guide the city’s recovery from their historic flood in June 2008.
RoyTorbert Headshot_web Roy Torbert is a Manager within Rocky Mountain Institute’s Buildings Practice, where he specializes in university net zero efforts, project cost analyses, and renewable and efficiency finance. He has worked with leading universities and global multinationals to analyze net-zero opportunities, and deliver roadmaps to reaching carbon reduction goals. He leads RMI’s work with the General Services Administration (GSA), including GSA’s partnerships with energy service companies to retrofit the federal building stock. He performs policy review, addresses market impediments to deep energy efficiency, and contributes to RMI’s outreach efforts. Roy assisted on research and analysis for RMI’s Reinventing Fire initiative and book, and currently manages the Reinventing Fire effort. Prior to RMI, Roy was a consultant with Booz Allen Hamilton in Washington D.C., working on software implementation and strategic management projects for the Army. He has expertise collaborating with regulators, policymakers, and private industry. He graduated from the College of William and Mary with a degree in International Relations and Business Finance. He has been trained in project management, software implementation, and data analysis.
small_gena_03_medium Gena Wirth, ASLA, is a designer, urban planner, and horticulturalist. As Project Manager at SCAPE, she pulls from her interdisciplinary training to create ecologically rich and culturally relevant landscapes from the infrastructural scale to the site level. Gena was on the original Oyster-tecture team and was the Project Manager for SCAPE’s involvement in SIRR, studying large-scale harbor-wide strategies for coastal protection measures that will be utilized in preparation for the next Superstorm. Gena also managed SCAPE’s winning Rebuild By Design proposal, Living Breakwaters, a climate change resiliency strategy for the South Shore of Staten Island. Developed in tandem with an interdisciplinary team of architects, engineers, marine biologists, and educators, the project was selected for $60M of implementation funding by the Department of Housing and Urban Development in the spring of 2014. Gena holds a Master of Landscape Architecture and Master of Urban Planning with Distinction from the Harvard University Graduate School of Design and a Bachelor of Science in Horticulture from the University of Delaware.
Dan-pic_web Daniel Anthony Howe, FASLA, AICP, is a consultant and educator in Raleigh. Long interested in the intersection of the professions of landscape architecture and city planning, Dan is currently Adjunct Professor of the Practice at NC State Design’s Landscape Architecture department, and after having recently retired from the City of Raleigh as Assistant City Manager, Dan continues to serve as President of the Hillsborough Street Community Services Corporation, and is a member of the Raleigh Bicycle / Pedestrian Advisory Commission, the Friends of the COR Museum Board and the DesignLife Board at the College of Design.