VOLUME 37

VOLUME 37

(N)EVERLASTING: IMPERMANENCE IN DESIGN CULTURE Volume 37 Full PDF (2015) Abstract With the arrival of the digital age and a culture dedicated to speed and efficiency, much of contemporary design has lost an old motivation: to create artifacts or experiences of permanence. Not even incredible breakthroughs remain for very long before they become the undiscussed norm or are replaced with new successes and new advances. Often it falls upon the shoulders of the designer to keep up with the perpetual flow of invention and reinvention, today more active and integrated into the flesh of society than ever. The river of progress is merciless and inevitable, and it’s only getting faster: but what does that mean, and how do we address it as consumers and creators? One of the hallmarks of this fast-paced environment is the concept of immutable impermanence: a strict recognition of the fact that not everything will last, and that not everything should last. Impermanence is far from a new idea, but...
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Volume 36

Volume 36

Form and Fiction: The role of design and designers in shaping, framing and reflecting reality “The idea of probable, preferable, plausible and possible futures – the space between reality and the impossible – allows designers to challenge design orthodoxy and prevailing technological visions so that fresh perspectives can begin to emerge." —Dunne & Raby Volume 37_Full PDF Abstract In Volume 36 of The Student Publication, we look to engage a discussion on the role of design and designers in shaping, framing, and reflecting reality. While the notion of the designer as a constructor or visionary of a future reality is not a new one, the increasing complexity and connectivity of our world begs for renewed vigor in its evaluation. As more people and entities are engaged with design, the traditional role of the designer as a creator of a single reality is shifting (credit kimberley). Yet one area that distinguishes the designer is our capacity and propensity to envision new futures through fiction. The dialogue...
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Volume 31: Relevance (2005)

Volume 31: Relevance (2005)

Relevance (Download PDF) Volume 31: Relevance, The Student Publication of the College of Design presents the work of a group of designers who, on the surface, fall into a number of disparate categories, negotiating issues spanning technology and manufacturing processes, economic class and culture, and environmental design considerations. Yet, all of the contributions to this volume are attempts to determine relevance by establishing new voices and identifying new audiences able to benefit from the exceptional potentialities of design. Relevance has never been more difficult to achieve than it is today in our increasingly fragmented and complex society; however, we must continue to pursue the question of relevance for the sake of those whose lives our work impacts directly. Relevance is a topic impossible to define but one which will not stand to be overlooked. Contributors: Adam Brakenbury, Jason Miller, Thomas Ryan, Jeremy Ficca, Franklin Bost, Billie Tsien, Adam Brakenbury, Thomas Ryan, Brigitte Shim, Gail Peter Borden, Eric Naslund, Frank Harmon, Paul Tesar, Jason Toth....
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Volume 29: Urban Design in Action (1985)

Volume 29: Urban Design in Action (1985)

Urban Design in Action (Download PDF) Urban Design in Action is the documentation of a record of achievement by professional assistance teams who answer to appeals for help from our cities. Called Regional/Urban Design Assistance Teams, or RIUDATs, they began in 1967 in response to a citizen's chance perception that the American Institute of Architects could help resolve the problems of his community. The first team discovered that the city is a living organism, embodying within prototypical problems the local culture, history and aspirations of its citizens. They sensed its continual evolution, from past to future forms. Most of all, they realized that the citizens wanted to help shape their own destinies, to participate in the formulation of policies whose implementation would result in a new sense of community. Contributors: Charles Brewer, John Clarke, Ben Cunningham, John Gaillard, Jules Gregory, John Kriken, Charles Redmon, Ronald Straka...
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Volume 28: Analysis of Precedent (1979)

Volume 28: Analysis of Precedent (1979)

Analysis Of Precedent (Download PDF) Analysis Of Precedent is a collection of diagrams which systematically analyze the works of eight architects. For each architect four representative buildings have been documented . The architects were purposefully selected from various periods of time to represent seemingly different approaches to architecture. Diagrams have been utilized to capture the essence of particular issues for each building. The issues stud ied are divided into three categories: elements, relationships, and ordering ideas. Physical attributes which can be compared independent of building type or function have been addressed in the diagrams. The analysis is not all inclusive in that it is limited to characteristics which can be diagrammed; thus, material palette is one obvious omission. Our analysis and interpretation has been of built form and therefore may not necessarily coincide with the architects intentions or the interpretation of others. In order to make the diagrams memorable, they ha ve been intentionally simplified . Likewise the accompanying text has been abbreviated...
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Volume 27: Great Models (1978)

Volume 27: Great Models (1978)

Great Models: Digressions On The Architectural Model (Download PDF) Architectural models offer a record of architecture older than the profession itself; a record which expresses all the varying spirit and meanings which both architects and their public give to buildings. It is an enchanting journey through entombments and religious devotions, through records left in fresco and mosaic, through the hands of workmen, architects and clients, and the eyes of the perpetually fascinated public. The earliest existing models were funerary objects placed in the tomb of the architect or donor of the edifice to surround him with the familiar, and as attributes of his work or generosity; such are the tiny Roman temple from Vulci (cover), and the Egyptian house replete with miniature leafy garden. Although the Romans occasionally accorded the architect such recognitions, the association of the model with the donor (the early client was frequently a wealthy patron building a church or temple, thus a "donor") rather than the architect is prevalent until...
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Volume 26: Carolina Dwelling (1978)

Volume 26: Carolina Dwelling (1978)

Carolina Dwelling: Towards Preservation of Place: In Celebration of the North Carolina Vernacular Landscape (Download PDF) Carolina Dwelling is a collection of essays that describe, analyze, trace the history and suggest the possible meanings of various features of the North Carolina vernacular landscape. The book's purpose is to provide a basis for collective reflection upon both the particularity and the process recorded in that landscape. The book was incited by a felt need to tend to what is here. This book's ultimate goal is the conservation of things and buildings and places . It seems appropriate at the beginning of such a book to inquire why we should be interested in the conservation of buildings and things and places, especially in an age so characteristically devoted to growth and change and bigness that an urge to conserve anything would seem to be both ethically and intellectually irrational.  ...
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Volume 25: Projections (1977)

Volume 25: Projections (1977)

Projections (Download PDF) Volume 25 is a collection of articles and opinions which project a complete statement of the possibilities and potentialities for the future of design. This statement also represents a variety of roles that designers may play as agents and makers concerned with environmental design. Ultimately this statement deals with the purpose of design and the corresponding motives of designers. Contributors: Shun Kanda, John Reuer, Richard Wilkinson, John Tector, Denis Wood, Edwin F. Harris, Vernon Shogren...
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Volume 24: Patterns (1975)

Volume 24: Patterns (1975)

Patterns (Download PDF) (excerpted from the introduction) Pattern, structural or applied, functions as a visual element enriching surface and form . Whether sophisticated mathematical configuration or loosely designed primitive crafts, pattern is structure composed of an image or motif repeated in a specific order. Repetition implies order and system, lending itself easily to mass production. The designer must be aware of the unique possibilities and limitations of mechanical systems of pattern production whether they involve fabric forming, printing, moulding, cutting, or a number of other methods. Considerations must be made in terms of size, shape, position of repeating units, the form and area of the total product and, the axis and stability of construction. Properties of the materials to be used, and other variables such as the possible number of values, colors, or textures, must also be considered. Within each design situation, technical or handcrafted, the designer manipulates visual elements and must be aware of basic principles of pattern development and design. Contributors: Carolyn Nelson, Deborah J....
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Volume 23: Designing the Method (1974)

Volume 23: Designing the Method (1974)

Designing the Method (Download PDF) (excerpted from the introduction) There is a growing realization of the need for new strategies to solve increasingly complex problems in the built environment. Rapid urbanization, accompanied by changes in goals, values, and technology, have resulted in changes in people's environmental needs and aspirations in such areas as education, housing, health , transportation, and recreation. In attempting to reconcile rapid growth, it has become apparent that solutions to architectural and planning problems, whether buildings, city blocks, or communities, should not be viewed as isolated physical objects; rather, they should be perceived as integral parts of an environmental system, with economic, social, and political ramifications. Viewing the built environment as a set of interrelated systems which provide for man's needs, it is evident that a change in one subsystem might modify elements of another subsystem, with unpredictable consequences. Nevertheless, the importance of considering this broader context is necessary when one subscribes to the view which integrates the built...
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Volume 20: Eleven Views (1973)

Volume 20: Eleven Views (1973)

Eleven Views (Download PDF) Eleven Views is a series of visual contributions that relate to light, seeing, sequence, relating, pattern, developing, form, defining, mood, revealing, texture, composing, process, finding. Contributors: John M. Bailey, David Robinson Godschalk, Peter Batchelor, Dr. Frances Fox Piven, Larry B. Morrison, Hugh Morley Zimmers, Chester W. Hartman, Randolph T. Hester, Bernard P. Spring, Avery R. Johnson...
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Volume 19: Projects (no.1) and (no.2) (1970)

Volume 19: Projects (no.1) and (no.2) (1970)

Issue 1: Projects (Download PDF) It has been several years since the Student Publication has presented work done in the School of Design; this issue, devoted to projects undertaken in the context of the School, attempts to sample current involvement. All of the contributors to Volume 19:1 have taught at the School; two are graduates as well. Their interests vary widely, from the conceptual study of environmental design by Vernon Shogren to an examination of perception by Russell Drake. Duncan Stuart and Fred Eichenberger explain and illustrate their process for t he mass production of unique items with offset lithography, while Gene Messick's inset folder reflects his experiments with intermedia. Together, these authors represent a port ion of t he activity of the School of Design; we hope that t his publication of their efforts will generate some interest in design-related disciplines. Issue 1 Contributors: Vernon Shogren, Russell Drake, Duncan Stuart, Fred Eichenberger, Gene Messick Issue 2: Design and Community (excerpted from the preface) Design and Community...
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Volume 08

Volume 08

Contributors: Henry Kamhoefner, Pietro Belluschi, Paul Buisson, Sherman Pardue, Guilio Pizzetti, Patrick Horsbrugh, Jose de Rivera, Prof. Dr. Ing. Guido Oberti, Prof. Dr. Ing. Arturo Danusso, James M. Fitch, Sylvia Crowe, Auguste Rodin, Norbert Gorwic, Melvin Ravitz, Barclay Jones, Percy Johnson-Marshall, Grady Claw, Thomas Hodne, Norman Klein...
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Volume 06

Volume 06

Contributors: Felix Cardellach, Pier Luigi Nervi, Duncan Stuart, Felix Candella, George Boas, Garret Eckbo, Mario Sal Vadori, Jose Luis Sert, Horacio Caminos, Atilio Gallo, Giuseppe Guarnieri...
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Volume 03:

Volume 03:

The School of Design is a community of people working. It is the people in it who are important. The contribution of each person in terms of what he gets out of it is no more or less important than is another's contribution in terms of what he gets out of it. But this is not the only consideration. School of Design is a community of people working. It is the people in it who are important. The contribution of each person in terms of what he gets out of it is no more or less important than is another's contribution in terms of what he gets out of it. But this is not the only consideration....
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Volume 02:

Volume 02:

Volume 2 In this first issue of our second year you will find us concerned with the man of social awareness. We dedicate this issue to the promotion of this idea. You will not only find manifestations of our development as architects but also thoughts in our development as citizens. We profess that the combination of the two are necessary in all creative activity....
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Volume 01

Volume 01

Volume 1 "This first issue of a Student Publication of the School of Design is dedicated to Matthew Nowicki and is concerned principally with his later work including an essay on architecture, his work in North Carolina and a selection from his last work - his sketches in India."...
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