JOIN US for the first Common Thread Symposium hosted by Art2Wear

Dates:  Friday and Saturday, November 6-7, 2015  (brochure time table available shortly)

Location: NC State University, Raleigh, NC

Common Thread Brochure and Schedule

Registration Information:

Link to Registration Website

Please notice that Friday and Saturday require separate registrations!  If you can join us both days, please register for each day.  Registration includes lectures, workshop fees and food (lunch and reception on Friday and breakfast and lunch on Saturday).  Please bring your printed registration receipt and proper student ID (if registering as a student) to the check-in table each morning.

Public:  $35 each day

Students (high school or college):  $25 each day

College of Design (or those students taking COD courses):  $12 for Friday and $6 for Saturday

Lecturers:

Dr. Susan Kay-Williams, Chief Executive Office of the Royal School of Needlework

Ilze Aviks, Contemporary Embroidery Artist

Precious Lovell, Contemporary Fiber Artist and Independent Researcher

Andrea Donnelly, Conceptual Weaver

Paula Kovarik, Contemporary Quilter

Workshop Leaders:

Ilze Aviks, Contemporary Embroidery Artist- FULL!

Paula Kovarik, Contemporary Quilter- FULL!

Precious Lovell, Contemporary Fiber Artist and Independent Researcher

Gabrielle Duggan, Contemporary Fiber Artist and Educator

Mary Kircher, Contemporary Weaver- FULL!

Kelly Kye, Contemporary Quilter

Mackenzie Bullard, Natural Dye Researcher- FULL!

Special Activities:

“Treasures of the Gregg” presentation at the Gregg Museum textile storage by Mary Hauser and Janine LeBlanc

“Faculty Show and Tell” informal pin-up of current work by faculty members of the Southeastern Fibers Educators Association

Information Session for Art+Design Graduate program

Portfolio Review Session for Fibers Art+Design Seniors

Funding for the 2015 Cotton Initiative + NC State Art2Wear Project was awarded in part through a competitive grant presented to Assistant Professor Katherine Diuguid by the Importer Support Program of the Cotton Board and Cotton Incorporated.

NCSU Art2Wear is supported by the NC State University Foundation.

Media of The Story of Colour in Textiles

Dr. Susan Kay-Williams, The Story of Colour in Textiles 

Dr. Kay-Williams is the Chief Executive of the Royal School of Needlework at Hampton Court. She has a long-term interest in textiles and was introduced to dyeing on a one-day workshop in the 1980s. Susan is constantly in demand as a speaker, especially for NADFAS in the UK, and internationally in the US and Japan. She is a fellow of the RSA.   She is the author of The Story of Colour in Textiles

More about the Royal School of Needlework: http://www.royal-needlework.org.uk/

Ilze Aviks,  A Reflection on Slow Textiles in a Digital Age

Have you been pondering the relevance of hand-work in a time of fast, electronic imagery?  The artist contemplates the visual and conceptual depth of this powerful combination.

How do you use Cotton in your work?

I monoprint on cotton cloth, moved by the soft, cozy texture–a universal, tactile memory.  Dye and pigments are beautifully absorbed into the fibers.  I hand-stitch with mercerized cotton floss, “mixing” different colors together in my needle.  This creates complexity of hue and flickering values of light and dark.

Ilze Aviks has maintained a studio in Durango, Colorado for over 30 years. During the last 20 years she has taught Studio and Art Theory courses at Fort Lewis College and has been a Visiting Artist at many universities including Eastern Illinois University, North Carolina State University, Kansas University, and the Kansas City Art Institute. She has conducted workshops in the U. S., Canada, and Australia. Aviks has contributed essays and reviews to Fiberarts, Surface Design Journal, and Telos Publications (Susan Lordi Marker Monograph and Art Textiles of the World: United States). Articles featuring Ilze Aviks’ work can be found in Surface Design Journal (Summer 2000), Fiberarts Design Books II and V, Fiberarts (Nov/Dec 2005), SDA Gallery Issue (2006), Contemporary Quilt Art by Kate Lenkowsky, Shuttle Spindle Dyepot (Fall 2007), Australian Threads (2007), American Craft (Feb/March 2009) and Surface Design Journal (Fall 2009).

More about Ilze Aviks:  http://www.ilzeaviks.com/

PLovell SWEAT BACKPrecious Lovell,  King Cotton- The King is Dead, Long Live the King!

This lecture explores some of the ways cotton has been utilized in Art. It will focus primarily, but not exclusively, on the art of African Americans and the African Diaspora.

How do you use Cotton in your work?

In my creative practice focusing on African Americans, cotton is essential as motif, metaphor and medium. As motif I’ve used cotton bolls to explore slave narratives about cotton picking. As metaphor and medium I’ve used cotton cloth to create enslaved African bodies, connecting them as commodities whose existence was interrelated.

More about Precious Lovell: https://precious-lovell.squarespace.com/

WhereWeMeet

 Andrea Donnelly, Art//Craft//Design: the Work and Practice of a Conceptual Weaver

Andrea Donnelly shares the evolution of her handwoven artwork from conceptual to wearable, the details of her fluid studio practice, and her journey as artist and small business.

How do you use Cotton in your work?

I use cotton in nearly all of my handwoven textiles, both functional and conceptual. It is a beautiful and hard-working fiber, existing as a neutral presence in my conceptual work. It’s also the backbone of my scarves: mixed with silk or wool, it creates a gorgeous, comfortable, heirloom-quality textile.

Inspired by the world around her, Andrea has been weaving and reweaving cloth that feels familiar yet very special, even mysterious, at the same time. For almost a decade, she has been utilizing this subtle strangeness to indicate a shift in context, bringing attention to that which is not visible, or often overlooked. The processes of making these cloths: weaving them by hand, imbedding imagery within woven structure, or unweaving painted cloth only to weave it back again, are vital to the content and quality of her work.

Andrea’s art is exhibited around the world from New York to Tokyo. She has been selected for numerous grants and awards, including a place in the permanent collection of the North Carolina Museum of Art and is one of three emerging artists in the U.S. to receive the prestigious 2015 Windgate Fellowship Project Grant.

More about Andrea Donnelly: http://andreadonnelly.com/

Paula Kovarik,  Follow the Thread: An Artist’s Journey

Paula Kovarik shares her story of transition from designer to artist through a survey of her work. She focuses on current events, personal insights, the joy of linework and taking risks.

Cotton is like a second skin. It covers, protects, holds memories and billows with strength. The texture can be flat, soft, starched or torn and still it is approachable. I use cotton thread, fabric and battings in my art. Used, stained or newly made, it is my favorite medium.

More about Paula Kovarik:  http://www.paulakovarik.com/

Ilze Aviks,  Altering Cloth with Hand-Stitching workshop- FULL!

Does slowing down the pace provide us with new insights into the act of making art?  Can SIMPLE hand-stitching alter shape, enrich color, transform visual space?  Alter our perceptions?  Let’s investigate!  In a series of impromptu stitched studies on your own prepared cloth, you will see what happens.

How do you use cotton in your work?

I monoprint on cotton cloth, moved by the soft, cozy texture–a universal, tactile memory.  Dye and pigments are beautifully absorbed into the fibers.  I hand-stitch with mercerized cotton floss, “mixing” different colors together in my needle.  This creates complexity of hue and flickering values of light and dark.

Ilze Aviks has maintained a studio in Durango, Colorado for over 30 years. During the last 20 years she has taught Studio and Art Theory courses at Fort Lewis College and has been a Visiting Artist at many universities including Eastern Illinois University, North Carolina State University, Kansas University, and the Kansas City Art Institute. She has conducted workshops in the U. S., Canada, and Australia. Aviks has contributed essays and reviews to Fiberarts, Surface Design Journal, and Telos Publications (Susan Lordi Marker Monograph and Art Textiles of the World: United States). Articles featuring Ilze Aviks’ work can be found in Surface Design Journal (Summer 2000), Fiberarts Design Books II and V, Fiberarts (Nov/Dec 2005), SDA Gallery Issue (2006), Contemporary Quilt Art by Kate Lenkowsky, Shuttle Spindle Dyepot (Fall 2007), Australian Threads (2007), American Craft (Feb/March 2009) and Surface Design Journal (Fall 2009).

More about Ilze Aviks:  http://www.ilzeaviks.com/

Sweat 1Precious Lovell, Call and Response collaborative workshop

The process of Call and Response requires group participation. This workshop will be participatory by incorporating individually stitched samples in the creation of a collective outcome. Spontaneous compositions will be created to form a conversation that will evolve from improvised responses to selected calls or prompts pertaining to cotton.

How do you use cotton in your work?

In my creative practice focusing on African Americans, cotton is essential as motif, metaphor and medium. As motif I’ve used cotton bolls to explore slave narratives about cotton picking. As metaphor and medium I’ve used cotton cloth to create enslaved African bodies, connecting them as commodities whose existence was interrelated.

More about Precious Lovell: https://precious-lovell.squarespace.com/

Paula Kovarik, Trust the Thread to Tell Your Story workshop- FULL!

Loosen up and explore new territory with line in this workshop. Learn to focus on the character of line and personal symbols through simple drawing and observation exercises. Develop techniques to accept the imperfect, accelerate ideas and draw from the imagination. Exercises will provide new tools for seeing, stitching, and completing concept-driven work.

How do you use cotton in your work?

Cotton is like a second skin. It covers, protects, holds memories and billows with strength. The texture can be flat, soft, starched or torn and still it is approachable. I use cotton thread, fabric and battings in my art. Used, stained or newly made, it is my favorite medium.

More about Paula Kovarik:  http://www.paulakovarik.com/

DugganOK

Gabrielle Duggan, Webwords and Impressions workshop
Students of this workshop will initiate a new work and begin prints derived from this original.
The ‘master’ will be developed by working yarn around a frame according to principles common to crochet, knit, and weaving techniques (familiarity encouraged but not required).
Mark-making with this original work will then be explored.

How do you use cotton in your work?
Cotton has informed my research intimately through crop I grew while pursuing my Masters (NCSU), and since through in-kind donations by Cotton Inc. These materials have been a versatile element in my installation work as well as my students’ color studies through traditional dye practices.

Gabrielle Duggan’s work has been exhibited at the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art and Cameron Art Museum (Out of Fashion, 2011-2012), and has been supported through the North Carolina Arts Council’s Regional Artist Project Grant (2011), Artspace’s Regional Emerging Artist Residency (2013-2014), and the Governor’s Island Art Fair Residency (2014).

Duggan served as a juror for NCSU’s Art2Wear runway show (2014), and as a founding member of the Common Seam Collective (2009-2013), and presently teaches Textile Art and Design as Visiting Lecturer at Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA.

More about Gabrielle Duggan: http://www.gabrielleduggan.com/

Weaving Journal top view_3338Mary Kircher, Journaling and Woven Collage workshop- FULL!

As a maker and observer, I am compelled to include fiber and found objects into my journaling process. I’ve created handmade books that include small cardboard looms for documenting travel or ideas for future projects. In this workshop participants will try woven collage using found objects, warp and yarns of your choice.

How do you use cotton in your work?

My WOVENtranslations weft-faced ikat artwork starts out as white cotton. The yarns are dyed in a predefined pattern and then woven on a cotton twine warp. Cotton yarns dye beautifully with variation in color and subtle blending that transforms my two dimensional weavings into lively compositions.

About Mary:

Mary Kircher is a fiber artist and textile designer specializing in hand weaving and custom dye techniques. Through her creative process has recently been analyzing aspects of interacting with the wilderness. She interprets activities and visuals experienced while camping, canoeing, or hiking and translate these experiences into woven objects. Her techniques include woven shibori, ikat, double weave and tapestry. She makes one-of-a-kind artwork for home or office in addition to  functional objects such as rugs or accessories. Mary is available to teach workshops including: Woven Shibori, Ikat Techniques, Beginning Weaving, and Weaving Journals.

More about Mary Kircher: http://woventranslations.com/

Mackenzie Bullard, Indigo Shibori Demonstration:  FULL!

Come explore the beauty and process of working with indigo. Various shibori and paste resist techniques will be discussed allowing shades of blue to transform the surface of cotton samples.  The “how to” make and maintain both a Fructose and Ferrous Vat will extend your indigo practice beyond the workshop.

Kelly Kye, Folded Star Quilt Block workshop

Kelly Kye is inspired by the deep-rooted history of textile manufacturing in my home state of North Carolina and the textile products being made here currently. She became passionate about the history of textiles and current manufacturing trends in North Carolina, after moving back from New York City. Kye uses this affection for inspiration and an opportunity to make a product that she has a personal relationship to while utilizing a sensible way of making a well crafted home textile. North Carolina has a rich history of textile manufacturing and I hope that KYE + HARDY will continue to contribute to that production.

More about Kelly Kye: http://www.kyeandhardy.com/

Local Hotels:  Please note some hotels will provide a further discount if you say you are attending an event at NC State!

*** Prices quoted  are from us calling the hotels directly***

The Double Tree Brownstone (ask for the NC State Visitor Rate)– within walking distance to campus
1707 Hillsborough Street, Raleigh, NC 27605
Standard King Room: $159+tax / night
Standard Two Double Room: $144+tax / night
320 Hillsborough Street, Raleigh, NC 27603
King or Two Double Room: $135+tax / night
The Hampton Inn Raleigh Downtown (ask for the NC State Visitor Rate)
600 Glenwood Avenue, Raleigh, NC 27603
King Room: $198+tax / night

The Holiday Inn at Crabtree Valley Mall

4100 Glenwood Avenue, Raleigh, North Carolina, 27612

King or Standard Room = $86.33/night

2201 Summit Park Lane  Raleigh, NC 27612
King Room = $110/night
1520 Blue Ridge Rd, Raleigh, NC 27607
1 King Room = $81.87 + tax / night (no double rooms available Nov 5th-8th)
1200 Hurricane Alley Way, at Trinity Rd., Raleigh, NC, 27607, US
1 King Room = $110 + tax / night

Parking:

Friday parking is available in the Pay Lot at the bottom level of the Colliseum Deck off of Dunn Avenue.  $10/day paid using debit or credit card.

Saturday parking is free on campus.  You may park in lot off Stinson Drive (the “Boney Lot”) or the Colliseum Deck off of Dunn Avenue.

Link to NCSU Visitor Parking Website.

Directions:

Downloadable PDF of campus map with buildings and parking highlighted:  Symposium Map- Labeled

Common Thread Symposium Map